Plants for Sale!

We sell very beautiful, very healthy, certified organic garden plants!
You can order them here to have your favorite varieties reserved for you in May 2019!organic, garden plants, summit, pennington, princeton, rutgers, farm, denville, hoboken, new jersey

Chickadee Creek Farm 2019 Plant Sale Order Form

Scroll down or click here for growing instructions

Plant list:

Basil Italian
Basil mixed flavor pack
Chives Onion
Cilantro caribe
Cucumber Max Pack pickle
Cucumber Marketmore
Flower, Calendula Strawberry Blond, High Mow
Flower, Nasturtium Dwarf Jewel, High Mowing
Flower, Poppy Shirley double choice mix
Flower, Zinnia Bernary’s Mix
Ground Cherry Goldie
Kale Red Russian
Kale winterbor
Kale toscano
Lettuce Defender
Lettuce Red Salad Bowl
Lettuce Salad Bowl
Parsley darki curl
Parsley Giant of Italy
Pea Snap
Peppers, hot Cayenne
Peppers, hot jalafuego jalapeno
Peppers, hot habanero
Peppers, hot hot rod serrano
Peppers, hot Scotch Bonnet- mad hatter
Peppers, hot bastan poblano
Peppers, sweet Red Knight
Summer Squash Dunja
Summer Squash Zephyr
Tomato Big Beef
Tomato Black Prince
Tomato Brandywine (Rose)
Tomato Garden Peach
Tomato Tiren san marzano
Tomato Green Zebra
Tomato New Girl
Tomato Rutgers 250
Tomato Striped German
Tomato Sungold
Tomato super sweet 100


**Credit to Old Farmers’ Almanac:
Growing Instructions
Growing Tomatoes

  •  When to plant: For best results, plant after Mother’s Day, and no later than mid-June
  • Sun Exposure: Prefer full sun, or 6 hours of daily sunshine
  • Water: Prefers well-drained soil. Water when the first inch of soil is dry (typically 2 inches per week). If in a pot, it will require more frequent watering.
  • Spacing: Tomatoes love room! Plant 2 ft apart
  • Transplanting: Tomatoes grow roots off of their stems, providing strength. Pinch off a few of the lower branches on transplants, and plant the root ball deep enough so that the remaining lowest leaves are just above the surface of the soil. Water well!
  • Trellising: Use tomato cages or stakes. Tie plants to stakes using twine- leave room for the stem to grow.
  • Pruning: Trim suckers (side stems) so only one or two main stems grow. Suckers grow between the branch and main stem. Trim lower leaves as the plant matures.
  • Container growing: Tomatoes do well in pots! For best results, use a 5-gallon container or larger. Plant one tomato per pot, and provide a stake or tomato cage for support. Check water daily, and expect to water extra during summer months.
  • Fertilization: Incorporate fertilizer or aged compost into soil a week before planting. Side dress plants with fertilizer or compost every two weeks, starting when plant stem is 1-inch in diameter.
  • Tips: Grow alongside basil, chives, calendula, or nasturtium to assist with pest prevention.

 

Growing Peppers and Eggplant

  •  When to plant: For best results, plant after Mother’s Day, and no later than mid-June
  • Sun Exposure: Prefer full sun, or 6 hours of daily sunshine
  • Water: Prefers well-drained soil. Water when the first inch of soil is dry (typically 2 inches per week). If in a pot, it will require more frequent watering.
  • Spacing: Plant 18 inches apart
  • Trellising: Optional- use short tomato cages or stakes. Tie plants to stakes using twine- leave room for the stem to grow.
  • Container growing: For best results, use a 5-gallon container or larger. Transplant one plant per pot, and provide a stake or tomato cage for support. Check water daily, and expect to water extra during summer months.
  • Fertilization: Incorporate fertilizer or aged compost into soil a week before planting. Side dress with fertilizer or compost when plants are 1-inch in diameter.
  • Tips: Leave peppers on the plant longer for more flavor. Green peppers will turn orange or red when fully ripe. For hot peppers, this makes them even spicier!

 

Growing Perennial Herbs

  •  When to plant: Plant any time after the last spring frost.
  • Sun Exposure: Most herbs prefer full sun, but some can tolerate part shade
  • Water: Prefer well-drained soil. When small, be sure to provide plenty of water so they don’t dry out. Once mature, water when the first inch of soil is dry. If in a pot, it will require more frequent watering.
  • Spacing: Plant 18 to 24 inches apart
  • Transplanting: Plant so that the root ball is buried just below soil level. Water well. One note about mint- be sure to transplant only if you want it to spread. Mint will take over a garden if you plant it directly in the ground- try a pot for more controlled growth.
  • Pruning: In their first year, harvest sparingly to ensure they have healthy growth. Once mature, prune heavy, woody stems once per year in early spring. When harvesting, be sure to leave some leafy stems behind to promote new growth.
  • Container growing: Herbs do wonderfully in pots in the garden or inside by a sunny window. The more room you provide, the larger many herbs will grow. If in pots, be sure to bring freeze-sensitive perennial herbs inside during winter. Re-pot every few years to keep plants healthy.
  • Fertilization: Incorporate fertilizer or aged compost into soil a week before planting. Perennial herbs do not require much fertilization; fertilize once per year in spring.
  • Tips: Many herbs make great companion plants for your veggies. Plan out your garden ahead to enhance your plants’ benefits! If your herbs are in containers, this allows you easy rotation of your veggies, while still providing companionship year after year.

 

Growing Basil

  • When to plant: Plant any time after Mother’s Day- once all danger of frost has passed.
  • Sun Exposure: Prefer full sun, or 6 to 8 hours of daily sunshine
  • Water: Basil loves moisture, but prefers well-drained soil. During hot summer months, water freely.
  • Spacing: Plant 10 to 12 inches apart for largest growth.
  • Transplanting: Plant so that the root ball is buried just below soil level. Water well.
  • Pruning: After seedlings have their first six leaves, prune to above the second two. Every time a branch has six to eight leaves, prune back to its second two. This will encourage bushy regrowth. If flowers begin to grow from the tops of stems, pinch off immediately.
  • Container growing: Basil is a great container plant. Plant one or a few plants per pot- the larger the pot, the more you can plant. For an aesthetic and functional crop, try planting them with parsley and cilantro in a large pot or window planter. 6-8 inches of space will give them enough room to grow. Be pickier about watering in a pot- dig down with a finger; if the soil is dry below your second knuckle, add water.
  • Fertilization: Incorporate fertilizer or aged compost into soil a week before planting. Plant might do well without fertilization if your soil is rich. If they look like they need help, side dress plants lightly with fertilizer once or twice through the season.
  • Tips: Basil and tomatoes are lovely neighbors in the garden!

 

Growing Early Spring Crops- Lettuce, Kale, and Peas

  • When to plant: Plant as soon as the ground can be worked. If an unusual cold spell occurs after planting, just cover with row cover or a light sheet (create a “tent” in order to prevent damaging leaves) Remove covers after cold spell has passed.
  • Sun Exposure: Full or part sun. If planting later in spring, part shade is helpful to avoid bolting.
  • Water: Prefer well-drained soil- try to avoid planting if soil remains wet. Water sparingly, but don’t allow to fully dry out.
  • Spacing: Peas- 4 inches; Lettuce and kale- 4 to 12 inches (plants mature more with more room). If you want full-size plants, provide a full 12 inches.
  • Transplanting: Plant so that the root ball is just below soil surface. Water well. If you prefer full-sized plants, thin to 1-2 plants per hole at this time.
  • Trellising: Peas require trellising! They will climb on their own- plant them next to a fence, or provide with a stake or string. They will do the work.
  • Container growing: For the most efficient use of space, grow cut-and-come again lettuce and kale in pots. Put 3-4 plants in a pot, and continuously cut or pick leaves as they grow. Plants will continue to produce- but expect them to bolt in the summer heat.
  • Fertilization: Don’t over-fertilize! Peas should not need fertilizer. For lettuce and kale, incorporate fertilizer or compost into soil a week before planting. Side-dress plants with fertilizer 3 weeks after planting.
  • Tips: Grow lettuce and kale alongside chives or garlic to help with aphid control. Grow in the shade of tomatoes to extend the life of your cool-season crops.

 

Growing Summer Squash and Cucumbers

  • When to plant: For best results, plant after Mother’s Day. You can plant multiple successions (every three weeks) as late as mid-summer to keep your harvest going into fall, as well as fend off some common pests!
  • Sun Exposure: Prefer full sun
  • Water: Prefers well-drained soil. Water deeply (at least one inch of water) once per week. Water more diligently once fruit begins forming- up to one gallon per week during summer months. If in a pot, it will require more frequent watering.
  • Spacing: Plant 18 to 24 inches apart. Cucumbers need less space- if trellising, they can be planted as close as 12 inches apart.
  • Transplanting: Roots are very delicate, so be very careful when transplanting. Plant so that the root ball is just below the soil surface. Water well.
  • Trellising: Squash do not need trellising, but for cucumbers it is optional. For easier harvest, allow to grow up a fence, string, or stake. Tie or clip vines to the trellis for added strength.
  • Container growing: They can grow in containers, but give them plenty of space. Use at least a 5-gallon container for best results. If growing squash in a pot, wait 2-3 weeks after transplant and thin down to one plant per pot. For cucumbers, you may keep both plants, but be sure to use a tomato cage or provide a stake in the pot when you plant.
  • Fertilization: They are heavy feeders. Incorporate plenty of fertilizer or aged compost into soil a week before planting. Side dress plants with fertilizer or compost when their first blooms appear. Once harvest begins, fertilize occasionally for more vigorous growth.
  • Tips: If you notice flowers, but fruit never comes, you might not have enough pollinators. Attract pollinators by planting nasturtium, calendula, zinnias, or other flowers in your garden! Once fruit is ready, expect to harvest every few days- they grow fast, and taste best if they aren’t left on the vine too long.

Chickadee Creek Farm 2019 Plant Sale Order Form